Friday, 25 September 2020

ANOTHER GOOD REASON TO MAKE COMPOST FROM ORGANIC WASTE- Larvae Farming

If you have been reading this blog you will know the reason why we at the Nomad farm collect up all the fruit and vegetables (organic) waste from the Hotel and Restaurant.. It is so that we can be producing our own Organic fertiliser in the form of compost.

The Nomad farm today- All organic

However, this post is about another good reason to keep compost piles.. and this reason is fast becoming more and more popular around the world.. Larvae farming.

Larvae from the Compost piles

Larvae are the little grubs that are the young of other insects. Larvae (like maggots, and black fly larvae) tend to eat a huge about in a very short time meaning they grow very fast and they are very high in protein.

Earth Worms from this Jaccuzi wormary are also nutritious diet supplements for chickens and fish.

In some places around the world people actually eat larvae and grubs, to us it may seem strange for now but as the human population continues to outgrow food production grubs as a diet supplement will only become more common.

Currently, here in Kenya not many people know that one can literally farm larvae in compost piles, and not many people would A, want to go near the larvae and B, know why someone would WANT to farm larvae.


Compost piles = Larvae breeding

Well, Larvae, due to their veracious appetites can speed up the decomposition process inside the compost heaps, they take the 'waste' and break it down into compost.

Larvae grow very fast and are found in masses around fruit peels and rotting organic matter, for this reason they are quite a fast turn over 'harvest'. Some Larvae farms can produce over 2 tons of larvae a day!

Larvae are very much sought after for use making animal feed, both chickens and fish love the Larvae which adds to their free range diets. Even some of the feed given to herbivores such as cows in feedlots contains the high protein, dried-out and ground Larvae.

Mulch keeps moisture in the soil

Some people have even made their business collecting organic waste and farming larvae for chicken farms, fish farms or for commercial animals feeds.

Imagine how much organic waste is generated along Diani Beach in one day. Enough to make ALOT of compost for Organic farming and enough also to produce huge amounts of larvae... which .. if one looks sustainability wise.. could save quite a bit of money in the long run if one was BUYING animal feed.

Nomad farm chickens eating larvae collected for them from the Compost piles


Wednesday, 9 September 2020

MANAGING YOUR WASTE - AN ESSENTIAL STEP TO SUSTAINABLE THINKING AND PRACTICE

Years of daily waste production records 

Do you know that The Sands at Nomad has a waste separation and management system for all the different types of waste? 

This is because we understand and take our impact on our environment very seriously. Sadly, even now in 2020, one would find that VERY few other private or commercial properties take their impact so seriously.

Many still mix their waste types so making it's reuse or recyclability difficult, expensive (not cost effective) or impossible.
Waste Separation! At waiter stations, scullery, bar kitchen workstations, offices, laundry, workshops etc

Environmental Law in Kenya stipulates that ALL properties must separate the various types of waste produced. Many people would say that this is pointless for various reasons.. this is the wrong mentality and if you have had this thought this blog is for you.
Glass bottles collected for repurposing as building blocks.

In our daily opperations the Sands has 11 'sets' of bins around the hotel and restaurant, each 'set' is made up of 5 'bins', each one color coded for the type of waste that it is used for.. that is 55 waste separation bins for those mathematically challenged. 

Each morning the various departments deliver the already separated waste to the waste management point, here it is weighed and recorded by the 'Green Team' before the various waste types are then either stockpiled for recycling or delivered to the farm (repurposable items) or the recycling drop off points down the Diani Beach road.
Daily recording keeps one aware of how much waste one is producing.

The Sands has waste production records for the past three years which can be used to see patterns, excesses and weaknesses all in relation to the number of guests coming through. Stats like these help us to identify, reduce or recity our 'negative impacts'. 

 If there is one 'big' step that we suggest anyone can take to start their path towards sustainability it is managing your waste, be more aware of what waste to generate, be responsible. 


1. Identify all workstations where waste is generated. (Back and front of house) 
2. Identify spaces near workstations where you can locate 5 buckets or bins. 
3. Paint or spraypaint the bins in 5 colours so that they are easily recognisable in a busy kitchen or    
    workshop. 
4. Train staff on why separation is important, put up clear notices showing the colour code for each waste
     type. 
5. In busy kitchens ensure that there are 5 larger 'bulk' bins located nearby (monkey proof) for twice or
    thrice daily empties of the smaller. 
6. Allocate staff to manage and record the waste that is produced and to ensure the waste REMAINS 
    SEPARATED and not all thrown together again. 
7. Ensure there is transport available to take the various waste types to the correct locations where it is 
    reused, recycled or repurposed. 
8. If you can, record the waste produced on a computer so that one can clearly see trends through graphs.. 
    so showing paths to improve.

Fruit and Veg waste on the way to the Nomad farm.

Our identified waste types to date are below, the first 5 make up the 'set of bins' at each workstation:

METAL AND GLASS.                                                     - BLACK 
FRUIT AND VEGETABLE.                                             - GREEN  
PAPER, DIRTY NYLONS AND CARDBOARD            - WHITE
MEAT, STARCHES, CARBOHYDRATES.                        - RED 
HARD PLASTICS (HDPE,PET,LDPE ETC)              - YELLOW 

E-WASTE (ANY ELECTRICAL WASTE) 

FABRICS (NATURAL FABRICS DECOMPOSE, SYNTHETICS? - ENVIRONMENTAL NIGHTMARE) 

BUILDING/ RENOVATION WASTE (RUBBLE, WOOD, METAL, GLASS, PLASTICS, TILES, STONE) 

HAZARDOUS WASTES (ANYTHING CONTAINING TOXINS) 

BLACK WATER (SEWAGE) 

GREY WATER (BATHROOMS AND WASHUP)

GREASE AND OLD COOKING OIL (Check this out) https://www.mahoneyes.com/blog/15-creative-uses-of-used-cooking-oil-you-never-knew/ 
Grease Traps are essential and regulation in all commercial kitchens.. they are easy to build, they remove grease and oil before it clogs pipes and soak-pits leading to expensive exhaustion services.
IE Honeysucker


In case you are intrested, please read our past blogs for some ways we have reused or repurposed various waste types. If you have any other ideas, requests or feedback please do let us know. Together we can make a difference.. Go Green.
Chickens on the Nomad Farm eat veggie offcuts

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